Part 1: Our Lost Sisters in Mexico

Photo credit: http://vocesporlaesperanza.blogspot.ca/2013/03/zapatos-rojos-8-de-marzo.html
Photo credit: http://vocesporlaesperanza.blogspot.ca/2013/03/zapatos-rojos-8-de-marzo.html
[audio https://ia601502.us.archive.org/13/items/OURLOSTSISTERSINMEXICOFINALMp3Version1/OUR%20LOST%20SISTERS%20IN%20MEXICO%20(FINAL)%20mp3%20version%201.mp3]

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Feminicides–the killing of women because of their gender–have been occurring for decades in both Mexico and in Canada. Why has there been so much impunity surrounding these cases and so little justice for the victims and their families? What can be done to put a stop to them, to help Mexican women and Indigenous women in Canada live their lives unthreatened and in peace, as they should in both countries? What parallels can be drawn between both the Mexican and Canadian feminicide cases?

In this two-part documentary series, CKUT’s Emma Noradounkian seeks answers to all of these questions, and more. This is the first half of the documentary series; it delves into the cases of feminicides in Mexico.

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Mexican Horror Story: Legislative Elections and the Future of the Crisis-stricken Mexican State

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Photo credt: Emma Noradounkian
[audio https://ia801503.us.archive.org/27/items/MexicanElectionsInterviewsFinalCut2/Mexican%20elections%20interviews%20(Final%20cut)%202.mp3]

Click here to download.

Mexico is in the midst of an internationally-ignored humanitarian crisis, with more than 24, 000 cases of state-perpetrated disappearances and kidnappings since 2006, and a most recent case of 43 missing students from the College of Ayotzinapa in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico.

Adding to these numbers, the lead-up to the Mexican legislative elections saw dozens of political assassinations and more than 70 kidnapping and extortion cases. Despite his and his party’s alleged complicity in these human rights violations, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) re-secured a majority in Congress in the Mexican legislative elections on June 7.

On that same day, families of the 43 missing students and other Mexicans  took to the streets in several states in Southern Mexico and burned ballot boxes, as a way of disrupting these elections that were seen by many as a referendum on Peña Nieto and his political party.

CKUT’s Emma Noradounkian spoke with Andalusia Knoll, a freelance multimedia journalist based in Mexico City, and Dagoberto Acevedo, a member of the Comité pour les droits humains en Amérique latine, to get their take on what the future holds for the Mexican state and its people.