Countdown to Trump Inauguration

With the upcoming inauguration of the president-elect down south, CKUT’s News Collective would like to share some thoughts from Masha, a member of Russia’s Pussy Riot.

Pussy Riot is a feminist protest punk-band-meet-art-collective that uses performance and music to disseminate their defiance. The group’s “guerilla performance” in 2012 at the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow brought them international recognition and a two-year jail sentence for mocking Vladimir Putin and the Russian Orthodox Church’s support for the, then, presidential candidate.

In 2016, Pussy Riot again spoke out against the American president-elect. At the time of the interview, Trump was the Republican candidate for the 2016 Presidential election. In response to his success, two songs – “Straight Outta Pussy” and “Make America Great Again” – were released. Both their lyrics and music videos challenged his demonstrated misogyny, racism, and classism.

When asked about Trump, Masha described him as “a crazy asshole.” The interview further explores why tactics employed by feminists in the US and Canada cannot be compared with feminism’s tactics in the Russia, how the rise of Trump resembles that of Putin, and how the media can distort public opinion about struggles against the status quo.

The CKUT News Collective would like to encourage its listeners to go out and show solidarity with DC’s disruptions of Inauguration Day in Montreal.

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Rob Robinson on the international fight for housing!

Rob Robinson is a homeless and housing rights activist based in Brooklyn, New York, and does national and international organizing work with the National Economic and Social Rights Initiative, NESRI. Rob was in Montreal last week for the World Social Forum and sat down with CKUT’s Aaron Lakoff for an in-depth discussion on gentrification, the global right to housing, and taking back the land.

Émission spéciale sur le racisme et l’antiracisme avec Thérèse Namahoro

 

Click here to download

Émission spéciale autour d’un atelier intitulé L’ABC de l’antiracisme, longue entrevue avec Thérèse Namahoro diffusée sur En Profondeur le lundi 4 juillet entre 17h et 18h sur CKUT (ckut.ca et sur le 90.3fm à
soi-disant «Montréal»)

Jeudi 7 juillet 2016
à 15:30 au Pavillon Jean-Brillant à la salle B-4225, Thérèse
Namahoro et Lourdenie Jean présenteront un ABC de l’anti-racisme:
une conférence sur les luttes anti-racistes et comment elles
s’inscrivent spécifiquement dans la démarche féministe.

Lundi 4 juillet, nous avons dédié l’émission complète à cet abc de l’antiracisme selon
Thérèse Namahoro

Les thèmes abordés ont été :
– racisme systémique et au quotidien
– histoire du racisme au soi-disant «Québec» et au soi-disant «Canada»
-appropriation culturelle
-féminisme blanc
-féminisme intersectionnel
-profilage racial
-brutalité policière

et plusieurs autres

Pour plus d’info
concernant leur présentation à l’Université de Montréal :

https://www.facebook.com/events/790869647714089/

A Demand for Social Housing: Blue Bonnets Demonstration in C.D.N.

CKUT News spoke with Jen from the Cotes-Des-Neiges Community Council regarding the Blue Bonnets public demonstration, which took place the morning of June 22nd. The demonstration raised awareness and increased engagement towards the development of a large social housing project, proposed for the now-empty lot near Namur Metro.

This piece was produced for CKUT by Claudia Edwards

What is a Solidarity City? : A Migrant Justice Workshop

 

On June 14th, organizers for the Solidarity City Campaign hosted a workshop about how solidarity, mutual aid, support work and direct action can be implemented in order to further strengthen the voices of undocumented migrants, to increase visibility of their struggles, as well as to build a stronger support network within the city of Montreal consisting of undocumented people and their allies. CKUT spoke with the organizers beforehand, and an excerpt of the workshop presentation follows the interview.

This piece was produced for CKUT by Claudia Edwards.

Old Trees Matter

Source: Sauvons la falaise facebook page

Download here 

On March 29th, the association Sauvons la Falaise organised a peaceful gathering to protest against the decision of the owner of the Meadowbrook Golf course in Cote Saint Luc to cut down old silver maple trees. This event is part of the association’s general fight for the preservation of old trees in Montreal. CKUT reporter Chloe interviewed the founder of the association, Lisa Mintz, and an active member, Louise Chenevert, to get more information about the protest and the general state of tree preservation policies in Montreal.

“Imagine if you went outside in the spring and didn’t hear any birds singing […] you would feel inside that there is something missing” -Lisa Mintz 

lisa mintz
Lisa Mintz (source: Dario Ayala for the Montreal Gazette)

Lisa Mintz created Sauvons la Falaise to protect the falaise St-Jacques, a four-kilometer forester area between the Turcot Interchange and Montreal West. In this interview, she explains the ecological and cultural value of trees for people living in Montreal. She also denounces the state of  the city’s tree policy: few trees are being planted every year, laws are not implemented consistently and trees are being cut down without the consent of local residents.

 

In 2012, the city of Montreal decided to launch the Plan d’action Canopée, an ambitious project to plant 300 000 news trees over 10 years. While this might be a positive step towards the preservation of green spaces in Montreal, this plan overlooks the difference between new and old trees. As Louise Chenevert explains in this interview, older trees have a greater capacity to absorb carbon dioxide, their roots prevent erosion and they contribute to reduce urban temperatures.

“Sure they can replace trees in a few years with a little sapling that’s got have a dozen leaves on it but that cannot possibly replace a tree that’s got a huge canopy and that does an incredible amount of work for the environment” – Louise Chenevert

It is the Schéma d’aménagement et de développement de l’agglomération de Montréal that sets out the conditions under which Montrealers can cut down trees. According to Jonathan Théorêt, the director of the GRAME, these conditions are quite loose. While some municipalities systematically require a permit to cut down trees, it is not the case in all legislatures. CKUT reporter Chloe discussed with him the GRAME’s proposals to solve this problem.

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Idefix cries each time anyone cuts down a tree (source: Astérix et Obelix “The Mansion of Gods” p.12)

 

More, More, I want more! 

  • Contact Lisa (l-mintz@hotmail.com) and Louise (514 464 9094) to get involved with Sauvons la Falaise or for any further questions. They are thrilled to answer any questions about starting your own environmental association. Check out their facebook page 
  • Tree Planting! Sauvons la Falaise will be planting trees on March the 2nd (9am) with NDG WMAC [meeting place: St-Jacques and Cavendish]. BYP- bring your own poetry about trees. 
  • Join the GRAME’s campain “Un Arbre pour Mon Quartier”  and check out the group’s facebook page 
  • Join the Jane’s walk organised by Sauvons la Falaise. All the info is available here

 

 

 

Living on the Streets: Toronto vs MTL

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Source: http://www.globalresearch.ca/

https://archive.org/embed/RealDeRealEnMp3“>Download here

On March the 15th, the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty (OCAP) officially released its report Out in the Cold on the state of the Toronto shelter system . The study’s findings are based on numerous interviews with service users and workers. It points out to a shelter system in crisis, plagued by constant overcrowding, harsh living conditions and a city government unwilling to take action.

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Source: OCAP report “Out in the Cold”

CKUT reporter Chloe interviewed one of the writers of this report for a summary of the OCAP’s findings. Some of the statistics are hard to believe. For instance, 81% of the people surveyed stated that they had been denied a shelter bed because the shelters were full (see the chart above)! Equally shocking, in most shelters occupancy levels exceeded 90% every night. This is highly problematic given that  overcrowded shelters lead to a high stress environment, a poor night’s rest and health issues. Luckily, OCAP volunteers and engaged citizens are taking action against this situation. Check out this video to get an idea of the scope of the protests happening in Toronto. 

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Francois Boissy

To get a sense of the state of the shelter system in Montreal, we also interviewed Francois Boissy who is the director of operations at La Maison du Pere, one of the largest homeless shelters in the city. He points out some of the differences between the way the cities of Toronto and Montreal deal with their homeless populations.

Aside from the administrative aspect of the shelter systems of Toronto and Montreal, an important question remains: “how does it feel, for people on the ground, to experience the shelter system in both cities?” Michel, an ex-homeless man that lived on the streets for two years from 2009-2011, explained to our reporter his personal experience with Montreal shelters. In this fascinating interview he talks about the reasons why he became an itinerant in the first place, the different shelters he slept in,  food conditions and how shelter services helped him get out of the streets. We are truly grateful for his trust in sharing this story, the full interview is available for stream and download below.

Download here

More More I want More!

  • For the history of the Toronto shelter system click here. 
  • Find a critical (but pretty short!) analysis of the Montreal shelter system here