Indigenous People in Mainstream Medias

17342732_10154206512267102_5760765189315256589_n

As stories about Indigenous people are rarely covered in mainstream medias, same images about them come back again and again. According to Steve Bonspiel,  people tend to be dissociated from their lands and ressources they use. That is why, find a new way to reconcile those two things was the purpose of the Panel about Indigenous People in Mainstream Medias organized at Mc Gill University on March, 21st. Indeed, issues about Indigenous People are often marginalized in mainstream medias where they are portrayed as being primitive, violent and devious, or passive and submissive. Such depictions have become a comfortable frame of reference each time there is a question about Indigenous people, even though very few non-Natives have had the opportunity to meet a Native person in real life.

According to the panelists Steve Bonspiel – Editor at The Eastern Door – , Jessica Deer – Staff Reporter at The Eastern Door-, and Nakha Bertrand – Editor at Ricochet – Français–  who attended the Conference, mainstream medias should share stories about Indigenous lives and stories about the community for people to know and understand better communities without judging or producing new stereotypes about the ”un-known”.

On the subject, the final report made by Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in June 2015 admitted the lack of knowledges journalists had about Indigenous people implying a bad coverage of their real life.  It stated:

The country’s large newspapers, TV and radio news shows often contain misinformation, sweeping generalizations and galling stereotypes about Natives and Native affairs. The result is that most Canadians have little real knowledge of the country’s Native peoples or the issues that affect them.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission found little change in Canadian media coverage in the two decades since, concluding that ” this historical pattern persists “.

As long as journalists won’t ask real questions to Indigenous people as well as give a real critical viewpoint about issues which Indigenous people face  in their everyday life, we won’t be able to understand each other and move on. We need to give a voice to the voiceless !

Advertisements

Profiling of arabs and muslims in Canada : an historical perspective

As part of Israeli Apartheid Week, yesterday March 6, about 40 people gathered at the conference ‘Profiling of Arabs and Muslims in Canada : an historical perspective’ at Café artere. A conference organized by Tadamon Collective, which reunited the historian, Houda Asal and the activist Mary Foster as part of the BDS (boycott sanction and divestment) campaign.

Continue reading

Countdown to Trump Inauguration

With the upcoming inauguration of the president-elect down south, CKUT’s News Collective would like to share some thoughts from Masha, a member of Russia’s Pussy Riot.

Pussy Riot is a feminist protest punk-band-meet-art-collective that uses performance and music to disseminate their defiance. The group’s “guerilla performance” in 2012 at the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow brought them international recognition and a two-year jail sentence for mocking Vladimir Putin and the Russian Orthodox Church’s support for the, then, presidential candidate.

In 2016, Pussy Riot again spoke out against the American president-elect. At the time of the interview, Trump was the Republican candidate for the 2016 Presidential election. In response to his success, two songs – “Straight Outta Pussy” and “Make America Great Again” – were released. Both their lyrics and music videos challenged his demonstrated misogyny, racism, and classism.

When asked about Trump, Masha described him as “a crazy asshole.” The interview further explores why tactics employed by feminists in the US and Canada cannot be compared with feminism’s tactics in the Russia, how the rise of Trump resembles that of Putin, and how the media can distort public opinion about struggles against the status quo.

The CKUT News Collective would like to encourage its listeners to go out and show solidarity with DC’s disruptions of Inauguration Day in Montreal.

Re:Bodies Poetry Night: A Fundraiser for the Native Women’s Shelter of Montreal

On Monday July 4th the queer femme P.O.C. collective Re:Bodies held a poetry night at Coop l’Artère to raise funds for the Native Women’s Shelter of Montreal, as well as for Pagsibol. CKUT spoke with Nakuset, director of the women’s shelter, about their work and the services that they provide, and excerpts from the poetry night follow this interview.

For more information about how to get involved with the Native Women’s Shelter, check out www.nwsm.info.

This report was produced for CKUT by Claudia Edwards.

Anti Racial-Profiling Event

racial profiling
On March 21, the CSU Legal Information Clinic hosted a discussion and workshop concerning legal nuances in cases of racial profiling in policing.
Businessman Joel Debellefeuille gives a testimony of his Driving While Black experiences, and of subsequent interactions with courts, the Police Ethics Commissioner, and the Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission. CRARR Executive Director Fo Niemi then discusses the obstacles to effective civil rights protection in Quebec.
This piece was produced by Natalia Kalicki.

Interview with Director Mina Shum on “The Ninth Floor” Documentary, and Concordia’s Anti-Racist Movement of 1969

Photo Credit: VIFF

Click here to download.

In this interview we speak with Mina Shum, director of the recently released documentary “The Ninth Floor,” produced by the National Film Board of Canada, and competing in the upcoming Festival de Nouveau Cinema. The Ninth Floor delves back into the history of Concordia’s rarely talked about “Computer Riots,” forty-five years later, and features live interviews with the primarily black student protestors whom at the time had filed an official complaint about the racist practices of biology professor Perry Anderson. His rate of failures for black students was consistently high, but the administration’s weak response to the issue triggered the occupation of SGW’s ninth floor by the student protestors for almost two weeks.

The film will be screened on Friday October 9th, co-presented by Cinema Politica and the FNC.

This interview was produced by Claudia Edwards.