Indigenous People in Mainstream Medias

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As stories about Indigenous people are rarely covered in mainstream medias, same images about them come back again and again. According to Steve Bonspiel,  people tend to be dissociated from their lands and ressources they use. That is why, find a new way to reconcile those two things was the purpose of the Panel about Indigenous People in Mainstream Medias organized at Mc Gill University on March, 21st. Indeed, issues about Indigenous People are often marginalized in mainstream medias where they are portrayed as being primitive, violent and devious, or passive and submissive. Such depictions have become a comfortable frame of reference each time there is a question about Indigenous people, even though very few non-Natives have had the opportunity to meet a Native person in real life.

According to the panelists Steve Bonspiel – Editor at The Eastern Door – , Jessica Deer – Staff Reporter at The Eastern Door-, and Nakha Bertrand – Editor at Ricochet – Français–  who attended the Conference, mainstream medias should share stories about Indigenous lives and stories about the community for people to know and understand better communities without judging or producing new stereotypes about the ”un-known”.

On the subject, the final report made by Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in June 2015 admitted the lack of knowledges journalists had about Indigenous people implying a bad coverage of their real life.  It stated:

The country’s large newspapers, TV and radio news shows often contain misinformation, sweeping generalizations and galling stereotypes about Natives and Native affairs. The result is that most Canadians have little real knowledge of the country’s Native peoples or the issues that affect them.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission found little change in Canadian media coverage in the two decades since, concluding that ” this historical pattern persists “.

As long as journalists won’t ask real questions to Indigenous people as well as give a real critical viewpoint about issues which Indigenous people face  in their everyday life, we won’t be able to understand each other and move on. We need to give a voice to the voiceless !

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Profiling of arabs and muslims in Canada : an historical perspective

As part of Israeli Apartheid Week, yesterday March 6, about 40 people gathered at the conference ‘Profiling of Arabs and Muslims in Canada : an historical perspective’ at Café artere. A conference organized by Tadamon Collective, which reunited the historian, Houda Asal and the activist Mary Foster as part of the BDS (boycott sanction and divestment) campaign.

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Anti Racial-Profiling Event

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On March 21, the CSU Legal Information Clinic hosted a discussion and workshop concerning legal nuances in cases of racial profiling in policing.
Businessman Joel Debellefeuille gives a testimony of his Driving While Black experiences, and of subsequent interactions with courts, the Police Ethics Commissioner, and the Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission. CRARR Executive Director Fo Niemi then discusses the obstacles to effective civil rights protection in Quebec.
This piece was produced by Natalia Kalicki.

March 5th: International Women’s Day Conference 2016

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The 2016 conference was held at Concordia University.

Click here to view full playlist or download individual presentations.

 

The International Women’s Day Conference was held March 5, 2016 at Concordia University, and marked the 41st annual celebration of Women’s day and the march held on March 8th. International Women’s Day was only officially recognized by the U.N. in 1975. The conference was put together by Women of Diverse Origins, a grassroots anti-imperialist women’s network that organizes public events to educate, discuss and empower!

Presentation playlist order:
1. Jenny-Laure Sully, who fights against the deportation of Haitians.
2. Lorraine Guay, representative for theBoycott, Divestment, Sanctions against Israeli Apartheid movement.
3. Lucina Gordon and Jeannie Calvin, two Inuit students from Nunavik (with throat-singing featured near the end).
4. Marie Boti, from the International Women’s Alliance.
5. Marta Lucia Gomez, member of the Committee for Men’s rights in Latin America / Comité des droits de l’homme de l’Amérique latine.
6. Mélanie Sarazin, president of la Fédération des femmes du Québec.
7. Final statement and reflection of the International Women’s Day conference.

 
This event was recorded by Claudia Edwards.

Naomi Klein Book Talk in Montreal – “This Changes Everything: Capitalism Vs. the Climate”

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[audio http://www.radio4all.net/files/news@ckut.ca/1008-1-Naomi_Klein_talk_Sept_16_2014.mp3]

Click here to download audio

Naomi Klein was in Montreal on September 16, 2014 to launch her new book, “This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate” at the Imperial Theatre. The event was organized by Riccochet Media, and recorded by CKUT Radio.

For more information on her new book, or to order a copy, visit:

http://www.thischangeseverything.org