McGill University accused of withholding information on Military Ties

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(Photo Credit : Demilitarize McGill Facebook Page)

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CKUT spoke with Cadence O’Neal, an antiwar organizers at McGill. Students claim that McGill University is displaying increasing desperation in its bid to stop students from learning about military research on campus. The McGill administration is shelling out for an expert access-to-information legal team, Raymond Doray, which is going to new lengths to block ATI requests about military research, according to a press release issued this week.

Since 2012, McGill has been in court against a group of students from Demilitarize McGill, who
have been attempting to file Access to Information requests on the university’s ties with
military contractors and weapons companies. Up until now, the university has refused to comply with the requests.

While her request was filed in her first year of university, Cadence will have graduated this year before having access to this information. The request, which pertains to thousands of emails, is being contested by McGill on the grounds that they are not official property of the university. Other students who have filed requests for McGill have also been waiting since 2012. The fact that McGill has blocked these Access to Information Requests until now leads many to suspect their deep involvement in military contracting.

In October, the students will return to court to continue to press for their requests to be honoured.

Part 2: Our Lost Sisters in Canada

Photo credit: http://vocesporlaesperanza.blogspot.ca/2013/03/zapatos-rojos-8-de-marzo.html
Photo credit: http://vocesporlaesperanza.blogspot.ca/2013/03/zapatos-rojos-8-de-marzo.html
[audio https://ia601502.us.archive.org/29/items/OURLOSTSISTERSINCANADAFINALMp3Version/OUR%20LOST%20SISTERS%20IN%20CANADA%20(FINAL)%20mp3%20version.mp3]

Click here to download audio.

Feminicides–the killing of women because of their gender–have been occurring for decades in both Mexico and in Canada. Why has there been so much impunity surrounding these cases and so little justice for the victims and their families? What can be done to put a stop to them, to help Mexican women and Indigenous women in Canada live their lives unthreatened and in peace, as they should in both countries? What parallels can be drawn between both t he Mexican and Canadian feminicide cases?

In this two-part documentary series, CKUT’s Emma Noradounkian seeks answers to all of these questions, and more. This is the second half of the documentary series; it delves into the cases of feminicides in Canada

Part 1: Our Lost Sisters in Mexico

Photo credit: http://vocesporlaesperanza.blogspot.ca/2013/03/zapatos-rojos-8-de-marzo.html
Photo credit: http://vocesporlaesperanza.blogspot.ca/2013/03/zapatos-rojos-8-de-marzo.html
[audio https://ia601502.us.archive.org/13/items/OURLOSTSISTERSINMEXICOFINALMp3Version1/OUR%20LOST%20SISTERS%20IN%20MEXICO%20(FINAL)%20mp3%20version%201.mp3]

Click here to download audio.

Feminicides–the killing of women because of their gender–have been occurring for decades in both Mexico and in Canada. Why has there been so much impunity surrounding these cases and so little justice for the victims and their families? What can be done to put a stop to them, to help Mexican women and Indigenous women in Canada live their lives unthreatened and in peace, as they should in both countries? What parallels can be drawn between both the Mexican and Canadian feminicide cases?

In this two-part documentary series, CKUT’s Emma Noradounkian seeks answers to all of these questions, and more. This is the first half of the documentary series; it delves into the cases of feminicides in Mexico.

Federal Engagements for Homeless people : On Bus Tour With The RAPSIM

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(Photo Credit : RAPSIM Website)

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With a little over one month to go before the Canadian federal elections, the major political parties are making big promises to their electorate.The RAPSIM (“Rapsim”),a homeless advocacy group in Montreal, has struggled with several years of cuts to their federal funding. On September 10th ,the RAPSIM, along with several other organizations who work with drug users and people who suffers from mental illness (La rue des femmes, Dopamine …) went on a bus tour in three major areas impacted by these issues in the city : Berri (at Emilie Gamelin’ Square), in Hochelaga and in Atwater, at Cabot Square. The aim of the tour was to meet 3 candidates in the upcoming election: Simon Marchand, the Bloc Quebecois’ candidate in Hochelaga; Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet, NPD’ candidate in Hochelaga and Marc Garneau, liberal’ candidate in VilleMarie. CKUT’s was on the tour, and brings us this report in French.

The RAPSIM had three claims on this Bus Tour :

  • The restoration of general and Community nature of the Homelessness Partnerships Strategy , a federal program providing assistance to thousands of people in Montreal and elsewhere in Quebec;
  • A recurring increase federal support roaming $ 50 million in Quebec, starting in the 2016-2017 budget
  • A federal reinvestment in social housing

All the candidates accepted these requests, and underlined the importance of this issue in the Federal Elections.